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book reviews

Wonder

August–Auggie for short–Pullman is just like any other ten-year-old kid. He loves Star Wars, he loves to read, he’s funny, and he loves his dog Daisy. Auggie was born with a rare genetic condition, one that has required him to have seventeen surgeries. While his face doesn’t look like every other kid’s, he still acts just like every other kid. He has fears, he has dreams, and he wants to be accepted just like everyone else.

Wonder is a fantastic book, one that asks the reader to choose kindness over fear or misunderstanding. Usually, as kids and as adults, if we don’t understand something, it causes us to be fearful. There are many people who don’t understand why Auggie’s face is the way it is, or the challenges he’s overcome from birth to ten years old. Those who don’t choose kindness are seen are rude or ignorant throughout the novel. Jack and his little brother, who meet Auggie many years before seeing him in school, get a tongue lashing when they get home from the ice cream shop. Their mother is appalled at their behavior, and explains why she is so upset with them.

Throughout Wonder, Auggie is bullied and treated differently because of how he looks. He faces these fears, such as going to public school for the first time, with strength and grace. He makes friends with kids like Jack and Summer, kids who aren’t afraid to be kind to the new kid in their school. Auggie learns how to fend off his main bully Julian, a kid who doesn’t like him, and continues to say and treat Auggie as though he’s different. With his new friends by his side, August can face anything.

Throughout the school year, kids change and learn to include Auggie. Because of this kindness, Auggie also changes and grows. He wants to be seen as a big kid, who isn’t just known for his love of Star Wars. As the school year continues, August comes into his own, becoming more of his own person.

I love this book. It’s an important reminder to everyone, adults and kids, to be kind to everyone. I recommend this book to kids and adults, because it’s an uplifting story with a great message.

By Meghan B.

Hello! Thanks for checking out my blog! Despite being 29, I haven't lost my sense of child-like wonder for the world around me. I've been making up stories my whole life: My imaginative play with toys as a child has grown up with me, maturing into my imaginative wordplay with fantasy and sci-fi prose as well as free-verse poetry. I thrive on creating something with my hands and with my mind, using either my pen or my keyboard. When I'm not reading, writing, or knitting (or realistically, working), I'm watching Netflix, gaming, or hanging out with the people I love most: my friends, my family, or my boyfriend.

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