Proposal: Fight for Love

I did a surprise proposal, & it went surprisingly well. Here’s the song lyrics & words of my own that I used to propose to the love of my life, Rory:

Dear Rory,

There’s something I can’t quite explain: I’m so in love with you/You never take that away

You’re never second best,
you’re my one, completely

Where you go,
I will follow you.
Where you go,
I’m going too.

You’re the love of my life. I can’t believe how fast six years has flown by. It’s a long time that feels—honestly—like nothing at all.

I want to spend six more years by your side. I want to spend six decades with you.

You lift me up whenever I’m down. You help me laugh even when I’m sleepy. You’ve loved me through rainy, cloudy days & through sunny ones.

So,
I just want to know…Would you marry me?

Love,
MBB

[12.31.2020
edited 1.4.2021]

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The Poet X

The Poet X cover

Xiomara (X) is a poet. She writes poems daily in her notebook, writing about her life. When she discovers slam poetry, it changes her world.

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Xiomara (X) is a poet. She writes poems daily in her notebook, writing about her life. When she discovers slam poetry, it changes her world.

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Fat Goals

When you’re heavier,

you can’t just wear anything

When you’ve gained weight

from medications,

your stomach poofs out

bit by bit

until you look like you’re pregnant

When you’re going up in size,

you wonder why the hell is this happening to me?

Your pants no longer fit

your cup size goes up, too

your middle has more density

than it’s ever had before

At this point,

I’d rather be depressed & skinny

than happy & fat

MBB

1.13.2021

your eyes are an ocean

your blue-green waves
tug me from the soft sand & beckon me into your lapping waters,
where I splash until my skin is pebbled with goose-pimples

I slog through the water, logy with exhaustion
having spent hours drowning in your pounding waves

once more on the sand,
I’m warmed by the sudden eruption
of Volcanus heat from your undertow.

M.B.B.
[5/28/15
edited 5/23/2020
edited 1/3/2021]

Darius the Great is Not Okay

Darius has depression.

As a teenager, he’s had it for as long as he can remember. When his family decides to visit Iran, he feels apprehensive about finally meeting his grandparents—whom he’s only seen on Skype calls over the years. While in Iran, Darius befriend Sohrab, a young man about his age. As the two of them bond, Darius begins to open up to Sohrab, forming the first real friendship he’s ever had.

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Dear Facebook

You may think you know me, but you don’t.
See, you’re just a product of some guy’s algorithms, asocially portrayed by Jesse Edinburgh

You may think I’m gay because I joined
the group Gaymers,
when really I’m just demisexual
I champion those who are labeled different, because I’ve felt different growing up

You don’t know who I’ve crushed on over the years, or everyone I’ve ever loved or everyone I’ve ever hated

You don’t know that I like to think of myself as a camera & that JB is right,
tomorrow I’ll be me, but tonight, I’m a camera & a pen & a poet

I write to live, & live to write,
to break the glass ceiling above my head,
hovering like a raincloud

You might think I’m dating just a man, when really I’m dating someone whose genderfluid, encompassing the best of both worlds

MBB
12.30.2020

m.b.b.

writing is like playing Tetris
I fit the words into the right slot,
rotating the words around in my mouth
before laying the correct brick down

I am a poet,
just 29,
you can write tags on your city block
but you can’t write mine

I am the one & only M.B.B.,
razor sharp with my fountain pen’s nib
ready to write you a new one, anytime

M.B.B.
10/6/2020 (edited 12/2/2020)

Lists upon Lists

Guten morgen, everyone!

Today’s the day in which I compose my Christmas list. While I won’t tell you everything that I want (because it’s more of a want than a need), I do really like reading and knitting.

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Thanksgiving Day

Good evening, everyone!

Thanksgiving was 2 days ago. I got to spend the entire day with my family: my mom, my dad, and my sister. (Normally, we spend Thanksgiving with my grandparents, but refrained from doing so this year due to Covid ramping up in my home state.)

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Station Eleven

book cover for Station Eleven

A strain of flu creates an apocalyptic world, one where technology and modern comforts are seldom seen as the norm. Amid this new world are a group of traveling actors, a symphony of men and women who have survived the pandemic that altered their world.

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It’s been a while…

Hello, again! (Blows dust off the screen.)

It’s been a while, I realize. Lately, I’ve been getting used to the busy season at work. (I cashier at my local Target.) I’ve been doing my best to catch up on my book reviews, since I’m reading so much so relatively fast. I’m still just as passionate about books and entering new character’s lives as ever as I hurtle towards my reading goal of 40 out of 30 books on Goodreads.

Bullet journaling is my new passion, and while I may not be as talented as some, I still do my best to integrate creativity into my bujo. (This year’s bullet journal is going really well, better than my first attempt in 2018.)

I’m also falling back in love with podcasts. I’m currently finishing up “Nice White Parents,” which is a five-part series done by the New York Times about the struggle to achieve racial integration in one New York school–and the white parents that influence the decisions in this particular school. It’s gotten praise and criticism in its reviews, but for me (as the oldest daughter of two educators) I find this podcast interesting.

I’m looking forward to Thanksgiving, where I’ll be spending quality time with my immediate family. We are still very much up in the air about whether or not we’ll actually be going to my grandparents. Still, my family and I plan to be safe no matter what during this tremulous time.

What’s new with you?

Please stay safe,

Meghan B.

Educated

Tara Westover’s memoir left me wondering how a life can truly change with the help of an education.

I loved going to school. Throughout my childhood, I was taught in elementary school how to read, how to write, and learned common facts and ideas about the world. This continued throughout junior high and high school. In college, I expanded my knowledge of the world around me, and chose to declare a major in English as my main (and only) focus. I grew up learning to love getting an education: I worked hard, tried to teach myself how to study, and (more so in college) what it means to have an education. After reading Educated, I’m thinking more about what it truly means to have grown up with an education.

Tara grew up with very little of that. At a young age, her father stopped her from going to school.

On the highway below, the school bus rolls past without stopping.
I am only seven, but I understand that it is this fact, more than any other, that makes my family different: we don’t go to school.

pg. xiii, Prologue, Kindle edition

Tara grew up living in the mountains of Idaho, where she lived out her days running wild and free. As she got older, she worked for her father in the junkyard, then worked elsewhere. Her brother encouraged her to get her GED and go to college; he helped influence Tara into getting out of her parents house.

With a survivalist Mormon family, with an un-diagnosed bipolar father, and with a brother who became steadily more abusive, Tara sought getting an education as a way of getting out of her dysfunctional family.

At seventeen, Tara got into college, and later went on to Cambridge University. Tara first learned about the Holocaust in college, and had to further educate herself about topics that were common knowledge to her classmates. With the help of her mentors, she learned how to think critically, and how to navigate the world of academia. Her roommates helped her, too, mostly in teaching her personal hygiene, because her father didn’t believe in using soap to wash your hands after using the bathroom.

Educated has taught me how important it is to have an education. It’s important to have a basis of knowledge about the world around you, and to learn how to challenge yourself through higher learning by attending a university.

I’m so grateful to my family for having me pursue a college education. I not only learned how to write better, but how to be independent and live on my own. Without a higher education, I wouldn’t have my amazing English degree. I wouldn’t have made the close friends I now have because I went to college. If I had just gone into the workforce, I feel like I wouldn’t be as confident as I am now. I wouldn’t have the extra classes that I took under my belt.

For Tara, getting an education meant escaping her family, and becoming independent from her parents. While her education came at a cost, she still feels grateful that she went to college: “You could call this selfhood many things. Transformation. Metamorphosis. Falsity. Betrayal. I call it an education” (pg. 328, Kindle edition).

If you like reading memoirs, and if you like compelling non-fiction, Educated should be on your reading list.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Girl, Woman, Other

Girl, Woman, Other is a multi-faceted story about several women—young and old—who live in Great Britain. At first glance, it seems like the novel is comprised of vignettes, but the deeper you venture into the novel, the closer these women become. Every one of the characters is connected to someone else in some way: a daughter, a friend, a lover, or a mother.

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